Mount Agamenticus Conservation Region

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Many Uses: The Days of Skiing and Modern Recreation

Ski the Big AIn 1960 planning and construction for a ski area on Mt. A began. “The Big A” opened in December of 1964 and stayed in business for 9 years. Warm, saltwater winds from the Atlantic coupled with two low snow fall winters, hampered business and forced “The Big A” to shut down. Though the ski area had a short life, its impacts on the local landscape will be apparent for many years. Current trails, Goosefoot, Sweet Fern, Vulture’s view and parts of Witch Hazel, were all former ski trails.

A great deal of equipment was left behind including remnants of the “T bar” at both the top and bottom of Witch Hazel and various lift equipment and foundations at the base of the mountain, where Goosefoot, Cedar and Chick’s Brook intersect.

 

To the southwest of the base of the former “Big A” is a very deep, human made pond, which was used as a water retention system for the area’s snow making system; the diesel powered pump remains as an artifact. Today the pond serves as important habitat for local flora and fauna.

Ski the Big A

The shallow bedrock of the Mt. A region is once again a significant problem. Most of the ski trails were built along the “fall line” of the mountain, which follows the most direct route from the summit to the base. Hiking, biking, and off-roading all have considerable impact on “fall line trails.” A walk along any of the former ski trails will reveal a large amount of exposed bedrock. Not only does bedrock make for difficult hiking conditions, but it also increases the erosive potential of runoff. With less soil to absorb rain, runoff will increase in both volume and velocity, ultimately exposing more bedrock and exponentially increasing the erosive capacity of rainwater.

The shallow bedrock of the Mt. A region is once again a significant problem. Most of the ski trails were built along the “fall line” of the mountain, which follows the most direct route from the summit to the base. Hiking, biking, and off-roading all have considerable impact on “fall line trails.” A walk along any of the former ski trails will reveal a large amount of exposed bedrock. Not only does bedrock make for difficult hiking conditions, but it also increases the erosive potential of runoff. With less soil to absorb rain, runoff will increase in both volume and velocity, ultimately exposing more bedrock and exponentially increasing the erosive capacity of rainwater.

Last Updated on Monday, 11 February 2013 14:17

Spellings and meanings of "Agamenticus"

Accominta--Named by the natives of the York River.
Akukumigak--Chippewa, an expression referring to the place where land and water meet--the
shoreline
Agamenticus or Accominticus--a small tribe of the Pennacook confederacy that occupied a village at or near present day York.

Love Mount A?

Mount A Conservation Region consists of more than 10,000 acres of forest, wetlands, ponds and streams. It takes a lot of work to take care of this land. Support from volunteers helps protect this great place. Find out how you can help, by getting involved with Mt. A Conservation Region.